The Judd CV 5-Valve V8 F1 Engine.
© Tickford Owners Club 2018

Judd Tickford CV V8 5-Valve F1 Engine

Tickford had produced encouraging results with a 5-valve version of the Cosworth DFV engine in late 1987 and knowing Lotus would not have Honda engine’s in 1989 made approached to supply them for the1989 season. It was estimated that the Tickford modifications would provide the engine with an additional 25bhp on top of the 610bhp that the Judd CV V8 4-valve normally made. The engine was tested for the first time during Silverstone 1989 testing in the Lotus 101 and ran for 450 miles with encouraging results. It was brought to Paul Ricard and used in practice for the 1989 French Grand Prix, but throttle problems meant that the standard units were used in the race insted. It was run during practice for the British Grand Prix and proved 3mph faster down Hangar Straight, but question marks over reliability meant it again wasn't used in the race. When Peter Warr left Team Lotus and Tony Rudd took over before the German Grand Prix, the project was removed from the race programme and any further work was just done on the Dyno. Tickford also had a design around that time for a 3.5 V12 F1 Engine with a 5-valve head but needed funding to take the engine from concept to reality. The engine pictured above resides in the Transport Section of the Milton Keynes Museum.
AUTORED
The Judd CV 5-Valve V8 F1 Engine.
© Lorem ipsum dolor sit Nulla in mollit pariatur in, est ut dolor eu eiusmod lorem

Judd Tickford CV

V8 5-Valve F1

Engine

Tickford had produced encouraging results with a 5- valve version of the Cosworth DFV engine in late 1987 and knowing Lotus would not have Honda engine’s in 1989 made approached to supply them for the1989 season. It was estimated that the Tickford modifications would provide the engine with an additional 25bhp on top of the 610bhp that the Judd CV V8 4-valve normally made. The engine was tested for the first time during Silverstone 1989 testing in the Lotus 101 and ran for 450 miles with encouraging results. It was brought to Paul Ricard and used in practice for the 1989 French Grand Prix, but throttle problems meant that the standard units were used in the race insted. It was run during practice for the British Grand Prix and proved 3mph faster down Hangar Straight, but question marks over reliability meant it again wasn't used in the race. When Peter Warr left Team Lotus and Tony Rudd took over before the German Grand Prix, the project was removed from the race programme and any further work was just done on the Dyno. Tickford also had a design around that time for a 3.5 V12 F1 Engine with a 5- valve head but needed funding to take the engine from concept to reality. The engine pictured above resides in the Transport Section of the Milton Keynes Museum.

Pariatur dolor ut ea anim non cillum et

exercitation

Minim anim aute excepteur ad qui deserunt enim ut ut. Ut amet cupidatat qui ut in ut tempor ut cupidatat do nulla non. Enim quis non esse dolore culpa occaecat aute nisi do, duis dolore esse mollit qui. Ea commodo ad, minim officia esse! Dolor ut nostrud cupidatat sit proident, ut dolor aliquip velit. $0.00

Nostrud deserunt velit, duis

commodo excepteur

Magna consequat est voluptate eu. Eiusmod laboris, nulla esse cupidatat nostrud, amet sed quis in dolor culpa sed occaecat pariatur ea reprehenderit. Magna officia dolor Magna minim labore Pariatur cupidatat Aliquip id ea Veniam non ame Reprehenderit mollit Aliqua enim aliqua Consequat anim Ex anim ut amet dolore, sunt ipsum proident, aute nisi. Ut laboris officia sit in do fugiat, excepteur ea commodo cillum velit nulla. Dolor irure pariatur. $0.00